Who is … Kirstine ‘Babe’ Rædkjær?

She is a 20-year-old reality starlet who can currently be seen on Kanal 5’s second season of ‘Kongerne af Rømø’.

Babe!?
She gave herself the nickname and introduced herself accordingly when appearing on ‘Kongerne af Marielyst’, Denmark’s answer to ‘Jersey Shore’ (because it was so desperately needed!). She probably thought herself clever, forcing the cast to refer to her as a sexy female, but you know they were really thinking of the 1995 feature film of the same name.

So what happens on this show?
Eight individuals spend a summer in the Danish countryside getting drunk, getting naked, fighting and saying embarrassing things. The producers wanted to cause a scandal by showing sex on TV, but none of the contestants managed to actually score.

Do all the others have nicknames too?
Oh yes. There was Prada (a high-maintenance gay guy), JJ (after her bra size), Vodka (ran out of ideas and picked what she had for breakfast) and X (probably just didn’t want people to know he’d been on the show). Babe and two others (with nicknames so explicit we can’t print them) are the only ones of the original cast to come back for a second season.

So what does she do that’s so entertaining?
Babe calls herself the ultimate party girl, meaning she likes to flash her breasts and yell ‘woo’ a lot. What she doesn’t like to do is housework, fuelling a fair share of drama on both seasons. It’s not her fault though, or at least for initially signing up: she claims she was promised luxury and VIP treatment by K5 producers, and that didn’t include doing dishes. She’s threatened to move over to TV3, where contestants on shows like ‘Paradise Hotel’ and ‘Tempted’ get treated to laundry service.

Aiming high!
Hopefully her reality TV dreams will come true soon, before producers decide her 15 minutes are up:  “That’ll do pig, that’ll do.”





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