Today’s headlines – Thursday, Dec 6

SF deputy chairman steps down
Mathias Tesfaye, the deputy chairman of Socialistisk Folkeparti (SF), has decided to step down due to disagreements with the party over direction it has taken after Annette Vilhelmsen assumed the reins in early October. Tesfaye will remain a member of SF, but will withdraw from the party’s leadership. Tesfaye backed Astrid Krag’s losing bid to become SF leader after Villy Søvndal had stepped down. – Politiken

Marianne Jelved named new culture minister
The veteran MP takes over for fellow Radikale member Uffe Elbæk, who stepped down amid nepotism allegations yesterday. See full story

German legal battle threatens Danish banks
A 2011 verdict in Germany allowing compensation to bank customers who have lost money on certain types of investments could set a precedent for similar cases to be opened up against Danish banks. Danish borrowers look to be initiating their own compensation claims against banks here that have racked up billion-kroner losses on risky ‘swap contracts’. One law firm, Rödstenen, reports already receiving over 50 requests and expects the first cases to land in court this spring. – Berlingske

Maersk accused of spying
Shipping conglomerate A.P. Moller-Maersk has been accused by an American longshoremen’s union of spying on its representatives at the shipping terminal in Los Angeles, California. ILWU accuses Maersk of tapping its phones and spying on union representatives, leading to an eight-day strike that has paralysed the seven container terminals in the Los Angeles area. Maersk’s docking division, APM Terminals, has rejected the claims. – Børsen

More money, no new demands for private schools
Private schools look to be the big winners of the government’s proposed school reform. Although private schools are not funded by the state, they do receive state subsides, and according to the proposal, prviate school subsidies would increase at the same pace as public school budgets. But unlike public schools, they will not be required to meet the requirements set out in the reform. – Jyllands-Posten

Weather
A little snow, otherwise sunny. Highs around -1 C, temperatures falling to around -11 C overnight. Light to moderate winds. – DMI





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.