DSB fires political consultants

More changes at state-owned rail operator in the wake of Waterfrontgate

DSB has decided to terminate contracts with two political consultants following continued allegations of improper behaviour against another of the rail operator's PR firms.

“We want to make sure that it's clear that we distance ourselves from the methods mentioned in the media in recent days,” Jacob Høyer, a DSB spokesperson, said. 

Høyer was referring to revelations that Waterfront had drawn up psychological profiles of politicians involved with transport legislature. According to DSB, the assessments went “beyond what DSB wanted.” 

DSB reported it had been paying the two consultants 80,000 kroner per month each since November.

DSB came under fire earlier this week when it was revealed that the company paid Waterfront to keep freelance journalist Lars Abild busy so he would not have time to write critical articles about the rail operator. Waterfront boss Lars Poulsen also disclosed confidential information about Abild’s health to DSB.

Those revelations have already led to the sacking of one DSB executive, and the company’s management this week commissioned an independent investigation into the entire Waterfrontgate affair.

Høyer said the outcome of the investigation would lead to an assessment of the need to tighten DSB policy.

“We, like other companies, need advice in a wide range of fields, including politics,” said Høyer. “This case shows just how hard it is in practice to limit the scope of consultancy work.”

DSB paid Waterfront a reported 7.9 million kroner between 2009 and 2012.





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