March is the cruelest month … this year

Coldest March in 26 years and we aren’t out of the woods yet

It is likely that you think of the month of March as a time to soak up the rejuvenating sun rather than a month to battle the unforgiving eastern wind. And you would be right. DMI, the Danish meteorological institution, said that when it comes to the difference between this March and the last, it “has never seen anything like this.” 

Around this time last year, day temperatures were around the 15°C mark, with an average for the entire month of 5.7°C. March 2013, however, has only produced a measly average temperature of -1°C. That makes this month the coldest March since 1987.

The temperature difference between this year and the last not only represents an extension to the winter parka season, but also the delay of summer. DMI's meteorologist Martin Lindberg said that we might have to “wait well into April” for the coveted double digit temps, and the institute has officially classified March as a 'winter month'. That designation comes when the average monthly temperature is below the freezing point. The last time March earned a 'winter' designation was in 2006. Before that, it hadn't happened since 1996.

Finally, there is the cost of the cold to contend with. Recent figures from Nordea suggest that some households might see their average heating bill rise by 22 percent this winter due to the cold conditions of March.





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