Freed hostage Søren Lyngbjørn is home

Recently-returned Dane asking for peace and quiet while he recovers from his ordeal

Søren Lyngbjørn, who was held captive by Somali pirates for 838 days before he and his fellow Danish hostage, Eddy Lopez, and their four Filipino companions were released two weeks agois back on Danish soil in an undisclosed location.

“He has been in Denmark for a few days,” Lyngbjørn’s mother Gerda told TV 2 News. “He is doing well, under the circumstances.”

Gerda Lyngbjørn said that she has visited her son and he plans on staying in his secluded spot until he regains his strength.

Søren Lyngbjørn sent out a press release, via Shipcraft, the shipping company that employed Lyngbjørn and Lopez when they were taken, asking that his wish for privacy be respected.

“Right now, I need peace and quiet so that I can concentrate on getting well,” he said. “This has been an ordeal for my family, so I ask that everyone respect our need for privacy.”

Lyngbjørn thanked everyone for their interest in his well-being and praised his rescuers and Shipcraft for looking after his family while he was held captive.

Upon his release, it was reported that Lyngbjørn was suffering from a nerve infection and would need immediate hospital care upon returning to Denmark.





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