Axel Axgil dropped as square name

Lack of political support cited as reason for decision not to name prominent square after gay rights activist

City officials have announced they will not name a newly renovated square adjacent to City Hall after deceased gay rights activist Axel Axgil.

Deputy mayor Ayfer Baykal (Socialistisk Folkeparti), who heads the city body responsible for naming streets, said she was disappointed to have to drop the proposal to rename a portion of Rådhuspladsen after Axgil.

“I was still ready to name a square after Axel Axgil, as I didn’t believe that there was substance in the many allegations levelled at him,” Baykal told Politiken newspaper. “But we were too unprepared in this case, regrettably.”

Axel Axgil, who died in 2011 aged 96, founded the gay rights organisation now known as LGBT Danmark. In 1989, he and his partner became the world's first homosexual couple to enter into a registered partnership.





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