Cocaine hidden with Colombian bananas

Large quantities of cocaine have been discovered hidden in shipments of bananas from Colombia

Warehouse workers for supermarket chain Coop have found over 200 kilograms of cocaine in shipments of bananas in the past week. 

On Wednesday morning around 125 kilograms of cocaine were found in a pallet of bananas at a warehouse in Brøndby owned by supermarket chain Coop.

And last week another 80 kilograms were also found hidden among bananas in a Coop warehouse in Hasselager south of Aarhus.

Police inspector Bent Isager-Nielsen, from Københavns Vestegns Politi, told Jyllands-Posten newspaper the warehouse workers alerted the police immediately ater discovering the drugs.

“Coop reacted as it should,” Isager-Nielsen said. “We have no suspicion of irregularity at the Coop warehouse.”

Isager-Nielsen added that the cocaine, which has a combined street value of at least 80 million kroner, was a large haul by Danish standards.

“It seems rather well organised but we can’t, and won’t, say much more than that at the current moment,” he said. “It is not an investigation that we think residents can help us with, but we have started all the relevant procedures.”

The bananas came from Colombia and have had a long journey that police are now trying to trace.

Coop spokesperson Jens Juul Nielsen told Jyllands-Posten that all the bananas were part of the same shipment and arrived at a so-called ripening facility in Aarhus before they were sent out to warehouses in Hasselager and Brøndby that supplied nearby shops.

“We have informed our supplier in Colombia about it,” Juul Nielsen told Jyllands-Posten. “They check the goods before they are shipped to Europe so they wondered how this could happen and are now working to improve the control.”.





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