Cornelius to Cardiff

FC Copenhagen striker Andreas Cornelius is moving to Wales

FC Copenhagen hotshot Andreas Cornelius looks set to join English Premier League new boys Cardiff City after the two clubs reached an agreement today. The move is subject to a medical and values Cornelius at an estimated 70 million kroner. 

Cornelius was the Superliga’s top scorer last season with 18 goals in 32 games. He made his debut for the national team last year when he came on as a substitute against the Czech Republic and has since played five games, scoring one goal.

The striker had previously denied any transfer rumours. Earlier this year he stated in an interview with Sky Sports that “there is still a long way and I still have plenty to learn”, adding that his four-year contract “seems like a good timeframe for me”.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.