Which Sofia and William are yours?

With 20 out of 1,000 babies of each sex being named Sofia and William, they are the clear winners of 2012

If you name your newborn girl Sofia, Ida or Freja, double check that you bring the right baby home from the hospital as these were the top three girl names in 2012 according to Statistics Denmark.

A total of 57,916 little ones came to the world in Denmark in 2012. Of these, 552 babies were named Sofia, making it the most popular girl's name nationwide. It was the first time ever that Sofia topped the list.

But if you ask new parents in middle and northern Jutland, they will tell you that Ida, obviously, is the best girl’s name. In southern Denmark, the Norse goddess of love, Freja, is a clear source of inspiration and led to the most popular name for girls in the region.

The Sofia of the opposite sex is William, with a total of 580 little Willies coming in 2012. In second and third places were Lucas and Victor respectively. In southern, Jutland a bunch of Liams can celebrate their first birthday this year – possibly inspired by the Danish rapper Liam O’Conner, better known as L.O.C.. Nationwide, Liam was the sixth most popular name in 2012 with 497 baby boys sharing their name with the rapper. It was a big jump from 2011, when Liam was just the 47th most popular name.

Only just making in to the top 50 list of popular baby names in 2012 were Esther and Daniel, with 149 and 175 babies given these names respectively.

Top ten names (girls):
Sofia
Ida
Freja
Emma
Isabella
Sofie
Maja
Laura
Clara
Mathilde

Top ten names (boys):
William
Lucas
Victor
Noah
Oscar
Liam
Frederik
Emil
Oliver
Magnus
 

 





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