Forced vaccination to go forward

A one-month-old child will receive her second set of vaccination shots early next week, despite the objections of her parents, a judge ruled yesterday.

Immediately after she was born, the daughter of Vinita Brødholdt received a vaccination for hepatitis B, a disease her mother carries but is not infected with.

The girl’s parents objected to the vaccination being given out of concern it could cause epilepsy.

Doctors said the baby’s risk of becoming ill was less than the danger associated with not being vaccinated, something the court agreed with.

The vaccination had been planned for Friday, but was postponed until Monday in order for the hospital to have enough personnel on hand for the child to be observed for a 48-hour period. 

TV2 News





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