Late summer looks warm and sunny

Summer is drawing to a close, but there are still plenty of sunny days left, say meteorologists

This year’s seemingly endless stretch of summer-like weather will carry on into September, predicts DMI, the national meteorological institute.

DMI’s monthly forecast shows that Denmark finds itself sitting in a ridge of high-pressure that is sheltering us from bad weather. 

Even though occasional showers are looming for the coming weekend, they will be forced out by high pressure and we can expect temperatures of around 20 degrees for the next few weeks.

READ MORE: Driest summer of the millenium isn’t over yet

Warm, but getting colder

September is typically one of the driest months of the year, and in recent years it has been warmer than normal. Inevitably, however, the days are getting shorter, which will automatically bring down average temperatures over the course of the month. 

Clear skies usually bring mild temperatures during daylight hours and low temperatures during the night. Likewise, overcast weather brings higher night temperatures and lower day temperatures, DMI explains. That is why people may experience many warm and sunny days in September, even if the average temperature is gradually getting colder.

DMI warned that it is always difficult to make long-range forecasts, but said it was confident about the September forecast.

Hopefully, we can enjoy some sunny days before autumn eventually kicks in.





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