The Weekly Wrap – Sunday, September 29

A second look at some of the week’s best stories from online and print

If you're anything like us, your week may sometimes feel like a blur. 

That's why The Copenhagen Post is trying something different on Sundays. We will take a deep breath, a step back and a second look at some of the stories that made up the past seven days both in our printed weekly newspaper and online. 

As a reminder, you can also hear more from us – if you so wish – via Facebook and Twitter, and via our new daily newsletter, The Evening Post. And if you have a hard time getting your hands on a physical copy of the Post, why not sign up to have it delivered to your inbox? If you haven't read them yet, you can download this week's Copenhagen Post and InOut guide for free today. 

And, if if you enjoy The Weekly Wrap, why not sign up to receive it as an email each week?

Here are just some of the stories from the week that was:

– This week's cover story looked at the firestorm of debate centred on a Danish-Iranian artist's right to free speech

– Are we headed for an EU referendum, or will the eurosceptics come to the rescue?

– Vestas announced a big partnership with Japanese manufacturer Mitsubishi

– Road pricing has been called a sound solution for curing Copenhagen's traffic woes, but the transport minister dismissed the notion, preferring instead to focus on public transport and cycleways

– Roj TV was denied a chance to have its appeal heard in Supreme Court

– Audiences are complaining more about performances they don't like, but the consumer watchdog is suggesting they take a look at the bigger picture

– An Aarhus man has accused nightclubs in that city of discrimination againt foreigners

Lawmakers reacted to our story about foreign homeless and the problems they have finding help

– Expats love the tastes from back home. Read how some Danish businesses are working to import those foods to Denmark, and the logistical hurdles they deal with

– InOut has the scoop on what's going on in Copenhagen this week. Let managing editor Ben Hamilton tell you his picks

– Film reviewer Mark Walker didn't so much care for the new Princess Diana biopic

– In sports, Denmark's reputation for producing quality ice hockey players is growing, judging by the success some Danes are having in the NHL

Enjoy the remainder of your weekend. We'll be back at it tomorrow.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.