Storm cleanup begins

Commuters are told to give themselves extra time this morning. Cleanup after yesterday’s storm is well underway, but it will take time before all the damage is repaired

Commuters should expect that Monday’s storm will create significant problems for this morning's commute.

Drivers and cyclists should expect that roads and bike paths could be blocked or closed off by debris. 

Trains are reported to be operating, but at reduced service levels. Greater Copenhagen’s S-train and Kystbanen railway are among the hardest hit. Currently there is no S-train service between Gentofte and Hillerød stations on the E and B lines. DSB said it would operate coach service on the lines where there was no service, but recommended planning for longer travel times.

DSB said updates about train service would be available on its website dsb.dk and on travel website rejseplanen.dk.

Banedanmark, the organisation responsible for railway infrastructure, said it worked overnight to repair as much of the damage as possible, but said it would be impossible to have train service running as normal. Further information is expected later in the day.

Initial estimates put the storm’s damage at one billion kroner. By way of comparison, the December 1999 storm, which many people have compared to Monday's storm, caused 13 billion kroner in damages.





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