Ugly end to debate on free speech

A raised middle finger indication of the level of discourse on televised debate

The tone was fierce between stand-up comedian Omar Marzouk and artist Firoozeh Bazrafkan during a weekend debate on the DR2 Saturday night programme, Deadline.

Marzouk’s contention that the choice of those threatened by the Islamic group Call to Islam to go underground was an act of cowardice raised Bazrafkan’s hackles.

 Marzouk had posted on Facebook that members of far right party Dansk Folkeparti were little more than a bunch of “cowards with big mouths”. His post included a link to an article describing how DF member Tina Petersen has gone into hiding after she received death threats from Call to Islam and calling on her to “come back and fight”.

“There is a group of people who have received threats from the Call to Islam and are elevated to being martyrs for freedom of expression without actually having contributed anything,” Marzouk said during the debate.

READ MORE: Artist convicted of racism speaks out

Bazrafkan said that Marzouk did not understand the concept of freedom speech

“I totally do not care if it's a DF'er or an immigrant or anyone else,” said Bazrafkan. “Omar Marzouk should stop making light of people receiving death threats, whether he is a comedian or not.”

Is that your age or I.Q.?
She then flipped Marzouk the bird.

“The Call to Islam is a threat to the Danish freedom of expression and democracy, and if you do not realise it, here is what I have to say to you.”

Viewers were unimpressed with the level of the debate.

“All that was missing was Bazrafkan sticking her fingers in her ears and going ‘Lalalalalalalalal’” wrote one visitor to the DR2 website.





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