Denmark signs UN weapons treaty

Some 32 nations have joined the UN Arms Trade Treaty so far – another 18 are needed for it to be ratified

Denmark is among the 32 countries that have signed the UN Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) designed to hinder the flow of weapons to nations using them for committing war crimes, genocide and other crimes against humanity.

The foreign minister, Martin Lidegaard (R), is looking forward to the treaty being backed by another 18 countries to reach the total of 50 nations that it needs to be ratified and thus come into effect.

“For a long time Denmark has been among the nations that believe that the lack of regulation of the international weapons trade is a disgrace,” Lidegaard said, according to DR Nyheder. “This regulation will become a reality when the ATT comes into effect.”

READ MORE: Denmark dismantles last cluster bombs

Tougher regulation
The ATT will come into effect 90 days after at least 50 nations have signed, and it will oblige governments to approve the export of arms only after they have evaluated that the shipments fulfil a number of criteria.

“Among other criteria, weapons may not be exported to countries where they are in danger of being used for the suppression of human rights or war crimes,” Lidegaard said.

Denmark is contributing actively and financially to nations that have special support needs when it comes to the treaty’s implementation.  





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