Huge animal abuse case decided

Dyreværnet has a no-kill policy that ensures healthy animals are not put down

In one of Denmark’s biggest ever animal abuse cases, an owner has been forced to hand over 60 dogs to the animal welfare agency Dyreværnet and was stripped of the right to have animals for three years after the Eastern High Court confirmed the city court’s ruling in the case.

Dyreværnet has been involved with the case since 2013, when the owner refused to grant the agency access to the animals after being reported for animal abuse.

“On behalf of the dogs we are pleased about the decision,” Michael Kofoed, a spokesperson from the south Zealand and Lolland-Falster police, was quoted as saying in a press release from Dyreværnet.

“I am content that the many dogs are now handed over to Dyreværnet, even though the ruling of course isn’t pleasant for the owner.”

READ MORE: Minister wants improved welfare for research animals

No-kill policy
The 60 dogs had been staying at a dog kennel since 1 April 2014 and will now be transferred to Dyreværnet, despite the fact that the agency will struggle financially to accommodate the many dogs.

“I’m sure citizens will support and help where they can,” Signe Sehested Lund, the head of Dyreværnet, said. “Of course they won’t be put down – Dyreværnet will make sure they are treated if they are ill and get the treatment they need. Then they will be put up for adoption.”

Dyreværnet has a no-kill policy that ensures healthy animals are not put down.





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