Google Play now available in Denmark

Spotify competitor offers more music streaming options

Internet giant Google has opened the doors for its music streaming option, Google Play Music, in the Danish market.

The service joins an already crowded marketplace with Spotify, Wimp, Rdio TDC Play and others already competing for the growing number of music streaming customers.

Google Play will step into the market as already one of the largest, offering its ‘Free Access’ service at an introductory price of 79 kroner per month, which will jump to 99 kroner per month when the intro period expires.

READ MORE: Web graphic by Dane fuels international debate on Spotify prices

Google Play has been available in the US since 2011 and in other countries in Europe for some time. The service is the largest on tablets and mobile phones, where Google's Android system represents the vast majority of all sales.

Spotify recently announced that it has  hit 40 million users, of which 10 million use the paid service. The company is expanding, but continues to operate at a loss.

Artists not fans
While music fans love streaming services, artists in several countries are asking that governments readjust royalty rates that they say are costing them billions.

Several artists have reported that their songs were streamed millions of times and that they were paid almost nothing for the use of their intellectual property

 





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