Prince Joachim sells his castle

The prince and his wife hand over Schackenborg Castle to a new fund that he owns a stake in

Prince Joachim, the younger son of Queen Margrethe, has given up on his life as a farmer in southern Jutland and sold Schackenborg Castle to a new fund he has created in the name of his now former home, the Royal House announced today.

The 45-year-old prince and his wife, Princess Marie, will move to Copenhagen where most of his family resides. 

Tough decision
"Princess Marie and I are happy about our solution with the founders of the new fund," Prince Joachim said in a press release.

"It's been a difficult decision to sell Schackenborg, but I'm convinced that this solution is the best way to ensure the future of the castle."

Staying at Amalienborg
The couple will live at the queen’s castle in Amalienborg until they find their own place.

"It's still too early to say where in the Copenhagen area Prince Joachim and Princess Marie want to live, but the couple will move into their residence at Amalienborg Castle at first. The move will happen this summer," said Lord Chamberlain Ove Ullerup.

Lived in Schackenborg with first wife
Some 113 million kroner has been invested to establish the Schackenborg Fonden – Prince Joachim has himself invested 13 million kroner, the same amount he was granted to renovate the castle when he moved into Schackenborg in 1995 with his first wife Alexandra.

Prince Joachim is sixth in the line to inherit the Danish throne, following his elder brother Crown Prince Frederik and Frederik’s four children.





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