Report maps out extremism in Denmark

Some 15 groups make up anti-democratic organisations in Denmark

The Danish National Centre for Social Research released a report today in which it compiles information about 15 anti-democratic and extremist groups in Denmark. The groups represent religious organisations and political bodies form the far-right and far-left.

“There are three extremist milieus in Denmark with a total of 15 groups that are either radical right-wing, radical left-wing or Islamic,” a press release accompanying the report explained. Six of the groups are categorised as radical right-wing, four as radical left-wing and five as Islamist (see fact box).

Links to biker gangs
“All of the groups deny criminal activity or violence. But there are individuals involved with the milieus who use criminal and violent methods. For example, there are radical left-wing people who are ready to engage in conflict with the police. In the Islamist and right-wing radical milieus there are particular problems regarding biker gangs,” the press release continued.

The report highlights differences in the demographics and recruitment tactics of the different types of group.

Demographics
The far-right recruits are found to be mainly men and recruited through personal relations and the internet. The Islamist groups are similarly mainly male and also recruited through personal relations and networks. On the other hand, far-left organisations have a more even gender balance and recruitment is mostly via social events such as parties, concerts and demonstrations.

The report was commissioned by the Ministry of Integration and Social Affairs. Read the report (in Danish) here.





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