Would you attend a sober nightclub?

A sober nightclub in Stockholm finds initial success.

According to a 2014 report from the World Health Organisation, the average Danish drinker consumed 12.9 litres of alcohol in 2010.

The absence of a minimum drinking age seems to further have ingrained alcohol into Danish culture. However, can Danes enjoy a night out completely sober?

The answer to this question might be revealed soon if the idea catches on in Sweden.

Mårten Andersson, a Swedish stand-up comedian and a self-described former party animal, recently opened a nightclub in Stockholm called “Sober.” Other than having guests abstain from substances, Sober Nattklubb is like any other nightclub. There is loud music, flashing lights, and even drinks – simply without the alcohol.

To ensure the sobriety of party-goers, guests are breathalysed at the door.

Whether or not Sober’s initial sold-out success will last has yet to be seen. The nightclub plans to hold substance-free events once a month and then possibly expand to other Scandinavian countries, including Denmark.

“I’ve been sober for six months,” Andersson told Vice.com in August. “Life is too short for us to be wasted all the time. I want to inspire people and show them that you can have a bloody great time without alcohol. I want to offer an alternative to just getting hammered.” 





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