SAS required to pay for disabled costs

Supreme Court denies airline’s attempt to dodge bill

SAS is required to pay a 20 million kroner bill related to the cost of assisting disabled passengers at Copenhagen Airport.

The Supreme Court found the airline liable for the bill yesterday, thus exhausting all of SAS’s avenues of appeal.

The dispute arose after changes in EU rules that actually require airports, not airlines, to pay for services supplied to disabled passengers. 

Court costs add up
However, the rules did allow airports to impose a tariff on airlines for the cost of disability services. SAS has fought vigorously against paying that tax.

The Supreme Court reached the same decision as the High Court did in February 2013 – that SAS is liable for the fees. 

READ MORE: SAS did not receive illegal state aid, EU concludes

The various court cases have now added over one million kroner in costs to the total bill that SAS will now be forced to pay.

 





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