More aid earmarked for Syria

55 million kroner to help impoverished Syrians

In connection with his attendance at a large conference in Berlin concerning Syria, the trade and development minister, Mogens Jensen, has announced he will earmark an additional 55 million kroner of aid for the Syrians affected by the ongoing civil war and conflict with the Islamic State (IS).

The aid will be spent on providing food products, basic needs and medicine to the millions of displaced Syrians in and outside the nation’s borders who are desperately dependent on aid.

“There is a need for money to help the millions of Syrians fleeing the civil war and people are starving,” Jensen said in a press release.

“The situation is terrible and the international community must react – and we are doing so by giving this additional 55 million kroner. Among other things, the money will go to food that is delivered through the UN’s World Food Programme (WFP).”

READ MORE: More fighters going from Denmark to Syria than most other Western nations

Spilling across borders
Out of the 55 million kroner, 25 million will go to WFP’s efforts in Syria and neighbouring nations, while 14 million is earmarked for UN efforts across Syrian borders that aim to ensure better health and food production in remote areas in northern Syria.

Ten million kroner will go to the International Red Cross's efforts in the region, while the remaining six million kroner are for UN efforts concerning vulnerable areas in the Lebanese-Syrian border region.

During the Syria conference in Berlin this week, the international community will address the UN’s handling of the refuge crisis and its considerable repercussions for four of Syria’s neighbours Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Turkey.

With the latest aid contribution, the total Danish aid contribution to Syria has now reached 835 million kroner since the conflict started in 2011.





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