Anti-theft liquid makes Danish debut

A DNA-containing liquid used to mark valuables has been employed for the first time in Denmark

A new method of marking valuables as a means of theft protection has been used in Denmark for the first time. 

Special liquid containing DNA that is applied to valuables will make it much easier for police to reunite stolen goods with their owners. 

If a stolen item is found, police can compare the marking on the item with that of an international database. 

READ MORE: Police warn of organised Romanian burglars

Every bottle unique
Henrik Olsen – the CEO of Uni-Secure, a company that sells DNA liquid – explained to DR how the marking works.

"What we do is apply the liquid to various personal effects, with each household receiving a unique bottle of DNA," enthused Olsen

"If police were to find such effects, they can compare the DNA on the effects with that of an online database and return them to the respectful owner."

A suburban neighbourhood in Aabenraa, Jutland, is the first example of Danish home-owners using the liquid collectively to mark their valuables. 

Marking is music to police ears
Police have welcomed the use of the DNA marking.

"We use many resources trying to return stolen goods to owners, as the majority are unmarked," said Christian Østergaard, a special consultant at the crime prevention secretariat, told DR   

"If we can solve cases of theft in a smarter way that enables us to use our time much better."

A bottle of clear DNA liquid costs 700 kroner. It dries out when it's applied to an item and becomes invisible to the naked eye.





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