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One in five Copenhageners has an alcohol dependency problem

More and more statistics are being released showing that Danes drink too much, and Greater Copenhagen is no exception, with 17 percent of residents showing signs of alcohol dependency, according to a new health policy drafted by the city.

Enter the city itself, and the figures climb. A district by district breakdown reveals that the number of residents with a drinking problem in the city centre, Nørrebro and Østerbro stand at 24, 22 and 19 percent respectively.

City fighting back
“These are sad statistics, which are made even worse by taboos about conversation and contact,” Ninna Thomsen, Copenhagen's deputy mayor for health, told Berkingske. "It is vital that Danes begin to wake up and talk about the problems relating to heavy alcohol consumption.”

Thomsen said the city would begin doing more to fight alcohol abuse.

READ MORE: Danes know they drink too much, study says

Statistics compiled in the course of research that will be used to develop policies to fight alcohol and hash abuse estimated that 80,000 locals show signs of alcohol dependence.

Children especially vulnerable
Thomsen was especially concerned that one out of every seven residents with an alcohol problem lived in a home with children. 

Children who live with alcoholics run a higher risk of developing alcohol problems themselves. 

Thomsen said  the system is failing children who are afraid to talk to someone about the alcohol problems in their homes.

“It is totally unacceptable,” said Thomsen. “We are committed to finding new ways to help the families, both the children and those with the problem. “We want to help them keep their jobs and live a normal life.”





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