Get ready for a Siberian winter

Eastern winds bringing in the big chill

It's about to get proper Baltic around here, as the weather coming in from the east will see temperatures drop dramatically in Denmark during the second half of next week.

Bo Christensen, a senior researcher with the national weather forecaster DMI, has predicted that high stratospheric temperatures will usher in weather fronts from the east, and with it a proper winter wonderland with loads of snow.

”What is happening in the stratosphere at the moment is a strong indicator that we will in the coming period experience wind from the east, and therefore low Siberian temperatures,” Christensen told Jyllands-Posten newspaper.

Christensen explained that with the temperature in the stratosphere increasing dramatically since the last days of December, the strong westerly winds have become weaker, thus increasing the chance of easterly winds moving in with real winter weather.

As freezing as in 2013
The last time the stratospheric temperature during winter was this high was back in January 2013, when -17.6 degrees C was measured on January 16 near Roskilde.

A quick weather search online reveals that the temperature in the Siberian city of Yakutsk, Russia is currently -31 degrees C. It won't get that cold in Denmark, but temperatures will dip well below freezing.

But cold weather from Siberia isn't necessarily a bad thing. Just ask the Danish '80s pop band Laban:





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