Say goodbye to the klippekort

Sunday is the last day you can buy the paper public transportation multi-ride ticket cards

If you’re still hesitant of using the much-maligned rejsekort then Sunday is your last chance to stock up on the paper klippekort travel cards.

The formerly ubiquitous paper tickets were supposed to be phased out in the summer of 2013, but due to several problems and consumer backlash their use was extended twice for a total of 18 months.

READ MORE: Sales of multi-ride tickets extended …again

But now DSB is sticking to their plan and as a consequence are seeing record numbers of rejsekort sales.

“In recent weeks we have made a record number of rejsekort. We are producing over 10,000 per week,” Christian Linnelyst, the head of sales and marketing for DSB, tells Politiken.

No mad rush
Even though there are have been problems with the electronic travel cards in the past, there has not been a mad dash to the country’s kiosks and shops for the remaining paper multi-ride tickets.

Linnelyst says DSB has not seen any “hoarding” of the klippekort tickets, but admits that there has been increased demand for them over this last week.

READ MORE: Sales of multi-ride tickets extended a year

Another alternative
An alternative to getting set up with an electronic travel card is to download Movia’s travel app, Mobilbilleter, which allows people to purchase public transport tickets form their mobile device.

Movia, the transport company, reports that since the beginning of the year the app has been downloaded nearly 600,000 times already, which is 50,000 times more than the app was downloaded for all of 2014.

The klippekort can be used until June 30. According to the DSB website, any unused “clips” on the card can then be refunded.





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