Average age in Copenhagen falling fast

Young Danes increasingly moving to the cities

While the average age of the population in rural areas of Denmark continues to increase, the average age in Copenhagen continues to fall steadily.

According to figures from national statistics keeper Danmarks Statistik, the average age in Copenhagen is now 35.9, the lowest in the country.

Significantly, the four cities with an average population age of under 40 are the four largest.

“Young people, especially young women, moving to the larger cities is a global mega trend,” Peter Philip Stephensen, the head of population developments research firm Dream, told Metroxpress newspaper.

READ MORE: Single women in Denmark increasingly moving to the city

Silver-haired islands
Stephensen's remarks are backed up by research from Roskilde University (RUC), which showed earlier this month that more and more single women in Denmark are leaving the men behind in the provincial areas and moving to the nation's three biggest cities.

The five youngest municipalities in Denmark are Copenhagen (35.9), Aarhus (37.6), Ishøj (38.5), Albertslund (39.1) and Odense (39.3).

The five oldest municipalities are all islands: Læsø (52.3), Ærø (50.9), Samsø (50.2) Langeland (50.1) and Fanø (48.7).





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