European Jews honour Danish Muslim

Niddal El-Jabri recognised for promoting tolerance and peace

When the European Jewish Association (EJA) meets this afternoon in Brussels to remember the victims of the shootings in Copenhagen last month, a young Danish Muslim will be in attendance.

Niddal El-Jabri – one of the organisers of the ring of peace initiative around the synagogue in Krystalgade in Copenhagen – will be honoured with a special prize by the EJA for his efforts in uniting Jews and Muslims in the aftermath of the shootings.

“We give this prize to Niddal El-Jabri in recognition of his efforts to promote tolerance and equality across communities,” Menachem Margolin, a rabbi from the EJA, told DR Nyheder.

“History continues to show us that good people are needed to fight evil. Mr El-Jabri has taken that message to heart and shown that peaceful actions from civilians work as an anti-venom against hateful violence and intolerance.”

READ MORE: How close-knit Denmark is responding to the Copenhagen shootings

Police relented
Niddal El-Jabri initially came up with the idea shortly after the Copenhagen terror attack in mid-February, and while the police initially turned his idea down due to security issues, they later relented and up to 1,000 people showed up on March 14 to create a human ring around the synagogue.

Denmark’s recently-appointed EU commissioner for competition, Margrethe Vestager, will be at hand to present El-Jabri with his prize.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.