More dangerous bunkers being removed

The government has set aside 4 million kroner to remove more of the dangerous wartime bunkers on the west coast of Denmark. Some 120 have already been removed since 2013.

The old decrepit concrete bunkers – decaying relics left behind by the Nazis in World War II – are a danger to the seaside visitors who can be injured by the bunkers’ exposed reinforcements.

“You must be able to swim and play by the west coast without having to fear the sharp iron spikes from old bunkers,” said Kirsten Brosbøl, the environment minister.

“So we have set aside 4 million kroner more to continue out efforts, which have removed about 120 dangerous bunkers from the beaches since 2013.”

READ MORE: Demolition of dangerous Nazi bunkers begins

Clearing ship passages
Some of the bunkers will be completely removed (see map here), while other will have their reinforcements – exposed by bunkers being eroded by the sea – cut down.

The government also revealed that it has earmarked 10.5 million kroner to ensure that harbour entrances are free of piles of sand moved in by the ocean currents.

“It’s important to the ship traffic that the necessary water depth is maintained. It’s the state’s responsibility just like it is to clear snow from the roads, and it will take great effort to keep the harbours and ship lanes open,” Brosbøl said.





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