Business needs talent: A new start


On June 25, I was pleased to announce that the Confederation of Danish Industry (DI) and the Consortium for Global Talent had joined forces in a new venture called DI Consortium for Global Talent.

The new venture will continue the focus of making it easier for Danish companies to attract and retain the right competences and skills from abroad. I look forward to leading the new initiative in close co-operation with an advisory board including top senior management.

Committed to lobby
Since the new government took office at Christiansborg, they have started to make their agendas and key messages official. I am happy to learn that the new government is in favour of accommodating the requests of the companies by introducing improved conditions for skilled foreign global talents. This should enable Danish companies to employ the foreign labour they need so badly.

And I intend to strive to make all the parties aware of the importance of the attraction and retention of skilled foreigners through lobbyism on behalf of our member companies.

A good track record
The consortium has achieved many good results over the last five years: the research tax scheme has been improved twice in 2012 and 2015; more international education is now available, both in Copenhagen and Aarhus; and more public information from the authorities is available in English.

Looking forward, our main key focus areas will be the branding of the Danish labour market and the opportunities our large, small and medium-sized companies can offer; a national talent strategy masterplan; and a further improvement of the research tax scheme.

A favourable merger
By joining forces with DI, I am confident that we will have a strong engine and platform from which we together can drive the Global Talent agenda in Denmark.

We want to prove that Denmark is one of the best countries to live and work in. Not only do we have many well-reputed large companies in Denmark, but also the small and medium-sized companies are often a good choice, so in short there is a lot to offer in the Danish workplace.

I am looking forward to sharing my views with the Weekly Post’s readers on this agenda in my next columns.





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