Countess Alexandra getting divorced

After eight years of marriage to photographer Martin Jørgensen, the ex-wife of Prince Joachim is getting another divorce

Countess Alexandra of Frederiksberg, the former wife of Princ Joachim, is getting another divorce, her solicitor Mette Ravn Steenstrup confirmed on Tuesday afternoon.

According to the statement, the 51-year-old’s eight-year marriage to photographer Martin Jørgensen, who is 14 years younger than the countess, has come to an end.

Jørgensen has already moved out of their shared home – a 356 sqm mansion in the fashionable district of Svanemøllen in Østerbro.

The Danish Royal Family have also been informed of the decision.

Signed a prenuptial agreement
Countess Alexandra and Jørgensen signed a prenuptial agreement before they got married in March 2007, which means the countess does not have to share her assets with Jørgensen after the divorce.

The couple first met in 1999 when Jørgensen visited Alexandra’s former residence, Schackenborg Castle, to make a program about Prince Joachim.

For several years, Jørgensen worked for his father’s company JJ Film, which has produced numerous documentaries about the Danish Royal Family, including ‘My home is my castle’, which was made on the occasion of Princess Alexandra’s 40th birthday.

Alexandra and Prince Joachim
Countess Alexandra, born Alexandra Christina Manley, was married to Prince Joachim in 1995.

Together they have two children: Prince Nicolai, who was born in 1999, and Prince Felix, who was born in 2002.

The wedding took place at the Frederiksborg Castle Chapel and the newlyweds settled at Schackenborg Castle in southern Jutland, where they stayed throughout their marriage.

The couple separated in September 2004 and got divorced in April 2005 after 10 years of marriage.

READ MORE: Prince Joachim sells his castle

Following their divorce Alexandra lost her title of princess, but Queen Margaret bestowed the title of Countess of Frederiksborg instead.

According to Ekstra Bladet, the countess has repeatedly stated she has a good relationship with her former in-laws and Prince Joachim.

 

 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.