Danish “monster” arrested in South Africa

21 female genitals in his freezer in Bloemfontein

The Danish man arrested last week for mutilating women in South Africa has been branded a “monster” by the world’s media after the police found pieces taken from 21 female genitalia in his freezer in Bloemfontein.

The police also confiscated surgical tools and anaesthetics from the man’s home following his arrest. Other police departments in South Africa are working together to ascertain who the genitals belong to.

“Most of these women were under heavy anaesthesia before he cut them,” Hangwani Mulaudzi, a spokesperson for the South African Police Service, told Ekstra Bladet tabloid.

The man, who has yet to be identified, told BT tabloid in June that at one point his wife had reported him to the police for mutilating her over a row. The man maintained she had agreed to be circumcised, and he was eventually released after his wife withdrew her accusation.

READ MORE: Police arrest men with automatic weapons on Øresund Bridge

On the run since 2010
Mulaudzi said the man had been arrested again after one of his other victims reported him to the police.

According to the interview with BT this summer, the man said his interest in circumcision started 20 years ago when he met a female priest in the S&M community in Denmark who wanted to be circumcised.

The man said it was the notorious ‘penis doctor’ Jørn Ege, who died last year, who taught him how to do the surgery and who provided him with the anaesthetics.

The man has apparently been on the run from the Danish police for several years. He fled the country after he was sentenced to six months in prison in 2010 for illegal weapons possession.





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