Joe Orton’s dark, presciently-titled exploration of fanaticism

CTC’s September production pulls no punches

 

Longing for a good laugh and a big portion of the deepest black humour?
The production Funeral Games, presented this September by the Copenhagen Theatre Circle, will give you exactly that. The story takes a humourous approach on religion and fanaticism and doesn’t accept any taboos.

“I believe its exploration of religious fanaticism and our ability to blindly succumb to ‘false prophets’ to still be relevant today,” explained Maria Lundbye, the director of the play.

“The story allows for the dialogues to amplify the absurdity of the characters’ beliefs and their hypocritical behaviour. The prejudices expressed by these characters, which were commonplace at the time, are unfortunately still present in our society today.”

The British playwright Joe Orton became famous, on the one hand for being dramatically murdered by his gay lover, but also because of his dark and smart works, which stand in a very British tradition.

“When I was asked to select a short play for the autumn production, I was drawn to the works of Joe Orton as I was seeking a piece that embraces the British tradition of irreverence for subjects often considered sacrosanct,” Maria Lundbye explained.

The CTC puts on three productions a year for the English-speaking community in town. They also offer theatre workshops for anyone interested.
Funeral Games features original music, bodyparts and some sexual references – a perfect way to spend a rainy autumn evening!

And by the way: a journalist plays an important role in the story – so we love it.





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