Danes fleeing the big cities

High property prices enabling young families to choose the rural option

The mass migration of Danes from the rural areas of the country to the cities seems to have slowed down considerably recently.

Last year there was a net gain of just 764 new citizens in Copenhagen and 448 in Aarhus, which are the lowest rises since the financial crisis started in 2008.

Property prices a major factor
One of the main reasons is soaring property prices in the cities, contends Morten Skak, a professor at the University of Southern Denmark.

“Many purchased an apartment in the city and were stuck there when the prices fell,” he told Jyllands-Posten newspaper.

“But now the prices are so high that switching an apartment in the city to a home in the rural areas is the best it’s ever been.”

READ MORE: Ethnic Danes a minority in some urban districts

Immigration not urbanisation
It’s mostly families with children who have made the move out of the urban areas in order to find a more affordable place to live, although they don’t tend to stray too far from the cities in order to maintain their jobs.

But despite the exodus, the capital and Aarhus are still growing, although that has more to do with immigration and an increase in births than urbanisation.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.