Kids getting less pocket money

17 percent get no allowance to enjoy

Danish children are getting less pocket money than in the past, a study carried out by Nordea Bank shows.

This may negatively affect how they will manage their finances later in life, believes a consumer economist, Ann Lehmann Erichsen.

More given, less in pocket
While parents spend a lot of money on buying, for instance, digital toys and electronics for their children, they tend to give them less in monthly allowances, and children are therefore not learning about proper money management.

In the region of Southern Denmark, for example, 42 percent of the 6 to 17-year-olds receive some pocket money every month, 41 percent get money only now and then, and 17 percent get no money for personal spending at all.





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