Danish women getting lazier

A DTU study reveals they are less active and more overweight

A new study from the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark reveals Danish women don’t get enough movement.

According to the study, women took on average 1,100 fewer steps in 2011-2012 than they did in 2007-2008.

READ MORE: Danish women piling on the pounds

Generally less active
“In recent years, women have become more inactive and overweight,” stated Jeppe Matthiessen, a senior advisor at the National Food Institute.

Using pedometers, the researchers measured the level of activity among Danes and found both men and women move generally less than in the past, but women in particular choose the car more often than the bike.

A lack of movement may lead to obesity and a higher risk of developing various diseases, including type-2 diabetes and cancer, warn the researchers.





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