Fewer young Danes joining unions

Membership numbers have fallen considerably over the past 10-20 years

The Danish unions are in desperate need of young blood, according to a new report from Aalborg University (AU).

The report, compiled by the Centre for Labour Market Research (CARMA) at AU, showed that young Danes support the union movement, but are not becoming members.

“There is support for the institution of the union movement and the idea of professional unity, but there is criticism of the way they work,” Henning Jørgensen, a labour market researcher at CARMA, told DR Nyheder.

“The unions risk ending up as old-man associations. If it continues on as it has the past 20 years, you might as well merge LO [the union association] with Ældre Sagen [elderly advocacy organisation].”

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Down 50,000
Jørgensen contended that the unions need to step up their efforts to reach and appeal to the younger generation.

The report revealed that while most young Danes under 30 found the unions necessary, fewer are signing up themselves, compared to 10 or 20 years ago.

The unions under the umbrella of LO have 50,000 fewer members than 20 years ago, and a vast majority of those missing are new to the labour market.





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