Lego builds massive Olympic City model

Project is a gift from Denmark to Rio

Over the past 12 months, some 50 professional Lego builders have been working to produce a mini copy of the 2016 Olympics host city of Rio de Janeiro.

The model, which is a present from the Danish government to Rio in connection with the Olympic Games about to kick off in the Brazilian city, took 2,500 hours to produce.

“Three different countries have been involved in creating all the hallmarks that can be seen here,” Paul Chrzan, the head of the project, told the Ritzau news agency.

“We have built 25 different Rio landmarks and they are all visible. We’ve put everything we could possibly fit into the city.”

READ MORE: Rio 2016: Ambitious Danes aiming for double-digit medal haul

Rio landmarks
The massive model was built using about 953,000 Lego bricks on a platform measuring five by six metres.

The project is the largest ever undertaken by the Danish toy producer in Latin America. Aside from the obvious Rio landmarks, such as the Christ the Redeemer statue, there are beaches, hotels and sports venues like the Maracanã Stadium.

Should you be fortunate to be in Rio over the Summer Games, the model can be viewed for free every day from August 5-21 between 11:00 and 21:00 at Boulevard Olímpico.

Alternately, you can see a video of the Lego model below.





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