Danes uneasy about bats

The flying mammals can be rather noisy

Every year at the end of the summer, the Danish Nature Agency (Naturstyrelsen) receives numerous requests from concerned homeowners regarding bats.

They feel uncomfortable and worry the nocturnal flying mammals will damage their houses.

Jan Kjærgaard, a biologist and ranger from Naturstyrelsen Søhøjlandet in Jutland, assures the public there is no need to fear the protected species.

He admits, however, that their high-pitched squeaking can be disturbing –especially at night.

READ MORE: Aarhus Municipality mulling plans to shoot noisy gulls

“Right now is the time when baby bats are growing bigger, and those who have experienced having teenagers at home know they can be rather noisy,” Kjærgaard told DR.

“When the confused youngsters fly out for the first time, they may accidentally hit a window.”

Despite their bad rep and various misconceptions, bats are by no means dangerous and won’t damage houses either, maintains Kjærgaard.

In fact, the animals are incredibly beneficial because they eat insects, including mosquitos.

Scientists have identified over 1,200 bat species around the world, but only 17 of them live in Denmark.





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