Copenhagen to get massive UN museum

Culture bulwark to strengthen Denmark’s international profile and its capital’s brand as a tourist destination

The Danish capital has been chosen as the site for the future headquarters of a new global UN museum.

The museum will be a physical and virtual communication centre designed to enlighten the public about the work the UN does around the world.

“The UN museum is a fantastic opportunity for the international community and Denmark,” said the foreign minister, Kristian Jensen.

“The world needs a strong UN: a UN that works to create a safe and peaceful world and works for sustainable development. But that needs communication and public involvement, so the government is backing the project.”

Aside from helping spread the message about the UN’s work and vision, the museum will also be an ambitious construction project that has the potential to strengthen Denmark’s international profile and Copenhagen’s brand as an international tourist destination.

READ MORE: UN City nominated for prestigious property award

Fundraising time
Jensen maintained that the UN museum should also be seen as a national project that needs the government, Copenhagen Municipality and private enterprise to contribute to its establishment.

The museum project consists of three aspects: the construction of the physical museum in Copenhagen, the establishment of a virtual online platform and a global live network linking to existing museums.

The Danish-Icelandic artist Ólafur Elíasson will be involved in its design, and should the plans for the museum go ahead, it is scheduled to open its doors to the public in 2022.

Copenhagen already has the UN City in Nordhavn, where some 1,500 people are employed at ten UN organisations.

Read more about the museum plans here (in English).





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