Danes show improving PISA results

Danish results better in all three categories as OECD average is reached and surpassed

For the first time, Danish school students have been ranked above the OECD average for maths, science and reading according to the most recent PISA test results.

Since the last PISA results in 2012, the Danish results have improved in all three categories, and out of 35 OECD nations, Denmark ranked seventh for maths, 15th for science and 15th for reading.

“I have to commend the teachers, particularly the maths teachers, who have managed to lift the students considerably,” said the education minister, Merete Riisager.

Riisager went on to contend that while the PISA results were encouraging, the test was just one of many tools that provide an overall insight into how Danish schools are progressing.

READ MORE: PISA results show dropping maths abilities

Singapore finished top in all three categories in the 2015 Pisa test (here in English).

Looking promising
The PISA test measures the capabilities of 15-year-old students in 72 countries (35 OECD) and economies and is published every three years.

The test is used with other international tests, such as TIMSS and PIRLS, to evaluate the level of Danish students.

TIMSS 2015 revealed that Danish fourth-graders were among the best for maths and science, while PIRLS 20111 indicated a similar showing for reading.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.