Danes not seeing Danish films

Despite Oscar nods, box office for homegrown films down by nearly a third

While Danish films are making a splash at the Academy Awards with Martin Zandvliet’s ‘Under sandet’ (’Land of Mine’) nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, and ‘Silent Nights’ being selected in the Live Action Short Film category, Danes themselves are giving Danish films a pass.

The box office for Danish movies hit a low of 2.8 million ticket sales, a 33 percent drop from 2015, according to the Danish Film Institute (DFI).

The thriller ‘Flaskepost fra P’ (‘A Conspiracy of Faith’) led the pack with 704,971 admissions, followed by the comedy ‘Klassefesten 3: Dåben’ (‘The Reunion 3’) with 538,506. Those two films took the top two slots, ahead of Hollywood offerings like ‘The Revenant’, ‘Zootopia’, ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’ and ‘Deadpool’.

“Frustrating”
Overall the market share for local movies fell to 21 percent, compared to 30 percent in 2015. Henrik Bo Nielsen, the head of the DFI, called the performance of Danish films in 2016 “disappointing”.

“It’s frustrating when a film doesn’t reach its audience, and this seems to be increasingly difficult for smaller films,” said Nielsen.

Claus Ladegaard, the head of film funding for the DFI, said the weaker market share was partially due to a large number of “experienced Danish directors who are currently working in the States.”





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.