Siberian chill sweeping across Denmark

Wind-chill factors can make temperatures feel like -20 out there

If you thought that spring was just around the corner, you can think again. Nah, keep those heavy coats and gloves close at (and on) hand.

This coming week is expected to be freezing as cold air continues to flow across Denmark from the east.

Temperatures could dip down to minus 10, but the wind-chill could make it feel as cold as minus 20. In fact, thermometers are not expected to display any temperatures above zero degrees Celsius – even during the day.

National weather forecaster DMI predicts varying amounts of snow will hit the country. While Bornholm and the southern parts of Zealand, Jutland and Lolland-Falster and the northern part of Funen will see some serious snowfall, the capital region won’t see much more than 2-3 cm spread over the next week.

“The areas are clearly the most vulnerable because we have a northeastern stream of cold air drifting in across Denmark,” Janne Hansen, a DMI meteorologist, told DR Nyheder.

READ MORE: Cold weather compounds urban air pollution

Homeless in danger
According to Hansen, the cold temperatures will persist through the week as the Siberian air continues moving east.

The road authority Vejdirektoratet also warned drivers to drive carefully and give themselves plenty of time to reach their destinations.

Meanwhile, homeless associations across the country have sounded the alarm, warning that homeless people are in risk of dying in the icy temperatures.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.