Theresa May to visit Denmark next week

British PM to discuss poison attack and Brexit with Lars Løkke Rasmussen

British PM Theresa May will be in Copenhagen next Monday to meet with her Danish counterpart Lars Løkke Rasmussen.

The meeting is expected to concern the ongoing issue regarding Russia and the poison attack in the UK, while Brexit will also be on the agenda.

“Denmark wants the closest-possible bonds with the EU and the UK, but it must be based on the correct balance between rights and duties,” said Rasmussen.

“The UK’s farewell to the EU is a reality and we must now focus on minimising the damage incurred by the divorce. So I’m pleased about the results that have been gained by the UK’s negotiations with the commission.”

READ MORE: Danish PM shows solidarity with the UK over spy attack

Russia denies involvement
The news comes just days after Russia responded in kind to a number of western countries kicking out Russian diplomats by expelling over 100 diplomats from Russia – including two from Denmark.

The west, led by the US and the UK, have accused Russia of being behind the suspected attempted murder attempt on former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter, who were found unconscious on a bench in Salisbury after being exposed to a nerve agent.

Russia, meanwhile, has denied any wrongdoing and indicated that the UK itself could be behind the attack in a bid to deflect attention away from flailing Brexit negotiations.

The last time May was in Denmark was in October 2016, just over three months after the contentious Brexit vote.





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