Mayday, Mayday! Here comes the heat

Sunshine and temperatures in the 20s on the horizon

Last year, the Danish summer was quite the letdown, particularly given the warm and sunny month of May the country enjoyed. Are we heading in the same direction this year?

Well, we might be, because according to the latest prognosis by weather forecaster DMI, the month of May will be a scorcher. The heat will arrive next week in earnest.

“A high-pressure system means we’ll be getting dry, sunny and gradually increasing temperatures. We will be able to enjoy lots of sunshine, weak winds and comfortable temperatures of around 20 degrees,” said Martin Lindberg, a DMI meteorologist.

According to DMI, the temperature could be slightly lower on the coast, but some areas of Denmark could experience temperatures spiking at 25 degrees.

READ MORE: Dreaded birch pollen season begins with promise it will be bad if the weather remains warm

Keep the good times rollin’
The following week also look promising thanks to a high-pressure system that is expected to hover above or near Scandinavia.

DMI is considerably more unsure about the week after that, although the forecast still looks “sensible”.

“The most likely scenario at the moment is that temperatures will be normal or a bit above normal, with less precipitation than is usually the case,” said Lindberg.

The highest temperature every recorded in the month of May in Denmark was 32 degrees, while the lowest was minus 8. The warmest average temperature for May was recorded way back in 1889, which landed at 13.8 degrees.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.