Flu cases in Copenhagen soaring

1813 hotline reports a doubling of inquiries over the last week

“I’ve got flu” is right up there with “Don’t buy me anything for Valentine’s Day” as one of the all-time great February fibs.

And here at the Copenhagen Post office, we’ve lost count of the number of new employees, who up until their diagnosis had not thought to mention their medical background.

But there is some truth in it, as February is probably the worst month for influenza in Denmark, and according to the 1813 hotline the number of cases is currently soaring in the capital region.

Flu inquiries have doubled
The numbers of calls has doubled in the last week, with many seeking medical help for their condition.

“We can see that there has been an increase in recent days,” Asmus Thun Bisgaard, the chief doctor at 1813, confirmed to TV2 Nyheder.

“Both children and adults are vulnerable. We can’t confirm that there have been any outbreaks yet, but it’s on its way.”

Better vaccine choice
Nevertheless, Bisgaard is confident the vaccination recommended by the authorities will work this year.

“It looks like the vaccine will cover the virus type doing the rounds. Those who have been vaccinated should be protected – unlike last year,” he said.

Bisgaard advises anyone suffering from symptoms to get plenty of fluids, take pain relief medication and avoid going into the office, school or kindergarten.

Pregnant women four to nine months into their term are particularly vulnerable, he added.





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