Denmark wins two BAFTA film awards

‘Druk’ and film editor Mikkel EG Nielsen the victors

Denmark last night won two BAFTA awards.

Another award for ‘Druk’
First off, ‘Druk’ (‘Another Round’) upset the odds to win ‘Best Film in a Foreign Language’ ahead of ‘Minari’, the Golden Globe winner that is ineligible for the Oscars because it is US-produced.

Thomas Vinterberg accepted the award via a video link, noting he did have “a suspicion that you Brits might like a film about drinking”.

Once laughter had subsided a little, he thanked a whole load of people – many of whom were standing behind him, including actor Thomas Bo Larsen, his wife, and Peter Aalbæk Jensen, the well-known Zentropa producer.

He ended on a poignant note by signalling out the biggest praise for his daughter Ida, who tragically died during pre-production.

Ahead of the ceremony, Vinterberg had speculated that the film had a good chance despite the stiff competition of Minari.

“Maybe we have something in common with the British. I remember the time I made ‘Festen’, and the UK was the only place where they laughed in the same places in the film as in Denmark. Maybe we have a common understanding of humour,” he told DR.

Danish editor now the favourite to take Oscar
Completing the Danish brace last night was Mikkel EG Nielsen who won the BAFTA for ‘Best Film Editing’ for ‘Sound of Metal’.

Nielsen has also been nominated for an Oscar in the same category, and he is now the favourite to triumph in the category, according to the experts on the site goldderby.com, where 56 percent believe the Dane will win.





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