Three cold case murders to be re-opened

New technology has made it possible to create profiles of killers almost 30 years after unsolved killings

Police in Copenhagen say they plan to re-open three murder investigations after reviewing evidence from 18 unsolved cases using new forensic technology. 

Forensic technicians told TV2 crime programme Station 2 that they had found possible DNA evidence in six of the so-called cold cases, and that in three of them they were able to retrieve enough DNA from crime scene objects that they had developed genetic profiles of possible suspects.

Police officials said the results showed that spending money to develop new forensic technology was a worthwhile investment but that their work was now a race against the clock. 

The first of the unsolved murders was committed in 1985, and the other two in 1990. 

“We have a profile, but not a suspect,” Jens Møller, a deputy superintendent with the Copenhagen Police, told TV2. “These guys might be dead for all we know.”

Of the 50 or so murders committed in Denmark each year only a handful go unsolved. 

Factfile | Cold cases, new leads

Copenhagen police will be re-opening investigations into three murders after applying new forensic technology to a total of 18 unsolved killings.

The three victims are:

Erne Jensine Østergaard Larsen, killed in 1985 at the age of 80

Hanne With, killed in 1990 at the age of 23

Anne Stine Geisler, killed in 1990 at the age of 18





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