Nation’s oldest bank on the market

Diba Bank is expected to receive offers within the next few days and could be sold some time during October

Diba Bank, Denmark’s oldest bank, appears to be preparing itself for sale, according to business news site FinansWatch.

Anonymous sources told FinansWatch that the Næstved-based bank is expected to receive initial bids from interested buyers within the next few days and could be sold sometime in October.

Cryptic messages from the board
Speculation concerning a possible sale has flourished since late last year when the bank’s former managing director, Petter Blondeau, quit in order to take over the reins at Svendborg Sparekasse.

Jesper Lund Wimmer was appointed as the temporary replacement, but at the time, Frank Møller Nielsen, the head of Diba Bank, wouldn’t say whether a new permanent director would be found.

“We are Denmark’s oldest bank, not that that is an ambition in itself, but we are aware of what is happening in the market,” Nielsen told FinansWatch after Blondeau stepped down. “There is always something going on and we can’t reject the notion that something could occur that we’d be part of.”

Affected by the financial crisis
Diba Bank has seen hard times since the onset of the Great Recession, losing 315 million kroner between 2008 and 2012.

The bank employs around 180 people in five branches across Zealand – in Næstved, Køge, Stevns, Holbæk, and Ringsted – and two on Bornholm, in Rønne and Nexø.





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