Loona Nights: Hits rare, misses everywhere

Loona Nights is a long-running series that is held three times a year at Dansehallerne. The concept is simple: an evening with ten slots, each ten minutes long, which artists can come and use as they see fit.

 

They can dance, sing, talk or just test their latest work in progress. Does that sound somewhat vague? That’s because it is, and it’s also what can make it great. I know that because I’ve been to many. Of course, they will always be hit-and-miss, but you might witness a whole evening of wonderful, diverse performances that will make you laugh, cry or possibly even frighten you. 

 

Unfortunately, that was not the case this time. I hardly laughed, but I did cry … out of boredom. Usually the evening is hosted by Bush Hartshorn, who takes to the stage in a suit, glittery shoes and a lucha libre mask. Sadly, he was unable to attend. However, in a video he sent the audience, he assured us that he’d left us in the capable hands of his sister. Seeing how my mother always says: “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all,” let it suffice to say that the regular host was sorely missed.

 

It wasn’t a case of the performances being exceptionally bad – well, one or two would actually qualify as just that – but rather that they were simply bland. I know the artists can perform work in progress, but that doesn’t mean work-I-just-started-on-yesterday. Usually it’s about a 50-50 ratio: some will be great, some not so great. In this case, there were only two acts worth mentioning: Sofie Lebech’s reading of ‘Invisible’ was funny, clever and sincere, and Linnea Lindh’s dance performance ‘Put The Power In Me’ had just the right amount of absurdity and entertainment.

 

Unfortunately, the evening never really took off, and with only two acts that were worth watching – out of a whopping ten – this became the longest, most tedious Friday night out I’ve had in a long time.

 

 

Loona Nights

October 25

Dansehallerne at Carlsberg





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.